Kayaking, Rowing

Basic technique and guideline you should know when sailing

This article will guide you on the basic techniques of sailing as progress, rotation and rowing control boat so you can row as you like.

Here are ways to hold the paddle

The distance between your hands when holding the handle of the paddle is approximately equal to the shoulder.

If the distance between your hands is too wide, you will have strong rowing force but quickly tired because the position of this hand requires more effort of the upper body to pull the paddle through the water.

If the distance between your hands is too narrow, then there is a high chance that your steps will have no force.

No matter where you hold the paddle, avoid holding it too tight, which can make you tired, instead, hold it comfortably, open your fingers a bit and hold the paddle moderately.

In each hand, press the forefinger and thumb and form an O-shape to hold the paddle handle comfortably. This is a favorite way of holding down, reducing fatigue, reminding you to push the paddle while padding forward.

When hands are placed in the correct position as follows.

The knuckles point up

Paddle blades erect

Beginners often use unfeathered paddle blades. Although, in windy conditions, the use of “feathered” (angled) paddle blades can reduce wind resistance.

When you pull the paddle out of the water, the wind can affect a flat paddle blade and cause it to catch the wind, creating resistance. Feathered paddle blades have a lower wind-less surface, creating less resistance. 

Most modern paddle handles have a switch in the middle that allows you to turn the oar blades 30 degrees, 45 degrees or 60 degrees. The common rotation angles are 45 degrees and 60 degrees.

Ideal angle? Depending on personal preferences and experience of each person. Most rowers prefer a larger angle because it reduces wind resistance. However, if this angle is greater than 60 degrees, the rower’s wrist will be painful, uncomfortable in the long run.

STEPS FOR ADVANCE

The step forward is the most basic movement when sailing, involving many factors, not just the arm force. A good stride is made possible by the effort to connect the upper part of the arm and the basic muscles (back, abdomen and glutes). Combining these muscle groups allows you to push the boat efficiently and without causing arm and shoulder fatigue.